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This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

Chinese Calligraphy 中国书法艺术

/Chinese Calligraphy 中国书法艺术

Chinese Calligraphy 中国书法艺术

Chinese Calligraphy is a form of calligraphy widely practiced in China and revered in the Chinese cultural sphere, which often includes Japan, Taiwan, Korea and Vietnam. The calligraphic tradition of East Asia originated and developed from China. There is a general standardization of the various styles of calligraphy in this tradition. Chinese calligraphy and ink and wash painting are closely related, since they are accomplished using similar tools and techniques. Chinese painting and calligraphy distinguish themselves from other cultural arts because they emphasize motion and are charged with dynamic life. According to Stanley-Baker, “Calligraphy is sheer life experienced through energy in motion that is registered as traces on silk or paper, with time and rhythm in shifting space its main ingredients.” Calligraphy has also led to the development of many forms of art in China, including seal carving, ornate paperweights, and inkstones.

Names
The local name for calligraphy is Shūfǎ 書法 in China, literally “the way/method/law of writing”; Shodō 書道 in Japan, literally “the way/principle of writing”; and Seoye (서예) 書藝 in Korea, literally “the skill/criterion of writing”. The calligraphy of Chinese characters is an important and appreciated aspect of Chinese culture. Chinese calligraphy is normally regarded as one of the “arts” (Chinese 藝術 pinyin: yìshù) in the countries where it is practiced.

As a practice
As a discipline calligraphy is, at the basic level, a pursuit -書法 pinyin: shūfǎ, “the rules of writing Han characters” - focused on writing well. Students aim to obtain the writing characteristics of exemplary pieces of writing. Elementary school students practice calligraphy in this way, as do elders practicing temporary calligraphy, without aspiring to artistic creation.

As an art
Calligraphy is also considered an art - 藝術/艺术 pinyin: yìshù, a relatively recent word meaning “art”, where works are appreciated more or only for their aesthetic qualities.

 

The article was abstracted from wikipedia.org

Xian Yushu “Han Yu’s Solution of Learning Progress” 鲜于枢《进学解卷》

By |五月 18th, 2015|Categories: Artwork, Calligraphy, Imperial China, Timeline, Yuan dynasty|Tags: , , |

Xian Yushu "Han Yu's Solution of Learning Progress" is a calligraphy artwork written by Yuan Dynasty famous calligrapher Xian Yushu (鲜于枢). The size of the calligraphy scroll is 49.1 cm high and 795.5 cm wide.

Jin Wangxun Boyuan Tie 晋王珣伯远帖

By |五月 3rd, 2015|Categories: Artwork, Calligraphy, Imperial China, Jin|Tags: , , , , |

Wang Xun (350-401), Jin dynasty (265-420) Undated, handscroll, ink on paper, 25.1 × 17.2 cm This set of letters by Wang Xun is the only authentic signed work from the Jin dynasty. Written in an

Wang Xizhi Calligraphy Pingan Tie (Complete Scroll) 王羲之平安帖全卷

By |五月 3rd, 2015|Categories: Calligraphy, Imperial China, Tang dynasty, Timeline|Tags: , , , , , , |

The caoshu (cursive script) calligraphy piece Ping'an Tie (Safety Wish Script), by Wang Xizhi, a renowned calligrapher of the Eastern Jin Dynasty (317-420), was recognized as a most valuable master piece, once praised by Emperor

Wang Xizhi “Sheng Jiao Xu” 王羲之圣教序

By |五月 2nd, 2015|Categories: Artwork, Calligraphy, Imperial China, Tang dynasty, Timeline|Tags: , , , |

"Da Tang Sanzang Sheng Jiao Xu" 《大唐三藏圣教序》 is an inscription written by Li Shimin (597-649, an emperor in Tang Dynasty) to memorialize Chinese famous Buddhist monk Xuanzang (玄奘596-664 Tang Dynasty). "Da Tang Sanzang Sheng Jiao

The Lantingji Xu Copy by Feng Chengsu 馮承素摹蘭亭序

By |四月 27th, 2015|Categories: Artwork, Calligraphy, Featured Post, Imperial China, Tang dynasty, Timeline|Tags: , |

The Lantingji Xu (simplified Chinese: 兰亭集序; traditional Chinese: 蘭亭集序; pinyin: Lántíngjí Xù; Wade–Giles:Lant'ingchi Hsü; literally: "Preface to the Poems Collected from the Orchid Pavilion") or Lanting Xu (蘭亭序) is a famous work of calligraphy by

Xian Yushu “Late Autumn Sentimental Poem” 鲜于枢《晚秋杂兴诗帖》

By |四月 18th, 2015|Categories: Artwork, Calligraphy, Imperial China, Timeline, Yuan dynasty|Tags: , , , , , |

Xian Yushu “Late Autumn Sentimental Poem” 鲜于枢《晚秋杂兴诗帖》 Chinese calligrapher Xian Yushu(鲜于枢 in chinese,1246-1302),also called Boji(伯机 in chinese), has artname is Kun xueshangming(困学山民 in chinese). He was born in Kaifeng, Henan province and grew up